Welcome
Support Centre
23 April 2014 
ISRCTN Register - International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number
Trial registration
Unique identification scheme
International databases
home  |   my details  |   ISRCTN Register  |   mRCT  |   links  |   information  |   news
Find trials
ISRCTN Register
tips on searching

Registration
New application
Updating record

Information
introduction
governing board
ISRCTN FAQs
data set
letter of agreement
request information
guidance notes
statistics

[ Print-friendly version ]
The effect of playing advergames that promote energy-dense snacks or fruit on actual food intake among children
ISRCTN ISRCTN17013832
DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN17013832
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier
EudraCT number
Public title The effect of playing advergames that promote energy-dense snacks or fruit on actual food intake among children
Scientific title The effect of playing advergames that promote energy-dense snacks or fruit on actual food intake among children: a randomised study
Acronym N/A
Serial number at source N/A
Study hypothesis 1. Children that play an advergame containing energy-dense snacks will eat more energy-dense snacks afterwards.
2. Children that play an advergame containing fruit will eat more fruit afterwards.
Lay summary Lay summary under review 2
Ethics approval Amsterdam School of Communication Research/ASCoR, 17 November 2011, ref: ASCoR-u-2011-03
Study design Randomized between-subject design
Countries of recruitment Netherlands
Disease/condition/study domain Obesity
Participants - inclusion criteria Children (girls and boys) between 8-10 years
Participants - exclusion criteria 1. Children younger than 8 years or older than 10 years
2. Children allergic to one of the test foods
Anticipated start date 01/10/2011
Anticipated end date 02/02/2012
Status of trial Completed
Patient information material Not available in web format, please use the contact details below to request a patient information sheet
Target number of participants 270
Interventions The children were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions, which involved playing
1.The energy-dense snacks advergame (i.e., promoting a popular candy brand and 8 different gummy and jelly sweets from this popular candy brand)
2. The fruit advergame (i.e., promoting a popular fruit brand and 8 different fruits, fruit drinks, or cups with fruit from this popular brand)
3. The nonfood advergame (i.e., promoting a popular Dutch toy brand and 8 individual toys from this popular toy brand); or
4. No game at all (control condition).

We randomized the conditions within schools and the conditions were counterbalanced to start with a different condition every day, so that none of the conditions were tested more in the morning or just before or after the break. The order of conditions was also counterbalanced to avoid any order effects. A professional game designer designed the advergames. All games were identical, except for the advertised brands and products. The game involved a memory game with 16 cards, whereby the brands appeared on the back of the cards, and the individual products (candy, fruit, or toys) appeared on the front of the cards. These products clearly displayed the brand logos. Furthermore, we showed the brand on the right side of the screen to enhance the awareness of the advertised brand. Similar to regular advergames, we integrated two specific features to immerse the children into the game. First, a digital timer appeared on the top-left of the screen, and a time bar appeared in the top center of the screen to exert time pressure on the children. Second, the game played an unpleasant sound when a child selected a false pair and a pleasant sound when a child selected a correct pair. All children were presented four bowls that contained four different food snacks. Two bowls contained energy-dense food snacks, (1) jelly candy (cola bottles) and (2) milk chocolate candy shells; and two bowls contained sliced fruit snacks, (3) bananas and (4) apples. Two bowls of test food, such as cola bottles and bananas, were identical to one of the food products shown in the advergame. In addition to these food snacks, we used other popular candy (milk chocolate candy shells) and fruit (apples) to test possible spill-over effects.
Primary outcome measure(s) 1. Kcal intake of fruit, energy dense snacks, and total. We preweighed the bowls that contained food and measured it again after the child left the room. We calculated kcal according to the amount they ate.
Secondary outcome measure(s) 1. Hunger [Visual analogue scales (VAS scale)]: not hungry - very hungry
2. Age, gender
Sources of funding Amsterdam School of Communication Research (ASCoR), University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
Trial website
Publications 1. 2013 results in http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23269821
Contact name Mr  Frans  Folkvord
  Address Kloveniersburgwal 48
  City/town Amsterdam
  Zip/Postcode 1012 CX
  Country Netherlands
  Email f.folkvord@uva.nl
Sponsor Amsterdam School of Communication Research (ASCoR) (Netherlands)
  Address Kloveniersburgwal 48
  City/town Amsterdam
  Zip/Postcode 1012 CX
  Country Netherlands
  Email f.folkvord@uva.nl
Date applied 14/09/2012
Last edited 21/03/2013
Date ISRCTN assigned 02/11/2012
Submit your trial protocol
Submit to Trials journal
Follow us on Twitter
© 2014 ISRCTN unless otherwise stated.